Container News

     

Since storage boxes come in standard sizes, they are compatible with preexisting channels of transportation, meaning that no out of the ordinary arrangements need to be made for their transportation. Therefore, Conex container homes can be quickly and efficiently shipped to wherever they are needed most. 

Easy Set-Up of Container Homes

Once the boxes are delivered, all that's needed for set-up is level ground that extends to match or exceed the size of the box. Again, this means that displaced persons will receive relief housing as soon as possible, with no inefficiency in transportation or construction. Building is one of the most lengthy processes when setting up traditional disaster housing, and Conex boxes circumvent that delay. 

Safety in Conex Box Houses 

Temporary housing should provide protection from the elements and keep its inhabitants secure. This is especially true in cases where displacement has already occurred. Conex boxes are certified wind and water resistant, and can be set up with HVAC systems in areas with extreme heat or cold. In addition, Conex container homes are very secure, meaning that the inhabitants and their possessions will be protected from potential security breaches. 

Durability in Container Housing

Relief housing is by definition temporary, which means that it must either be torn down or stored when the need is gone. Conex container homes are designed to be stored easily and efficiently, with no space wasted, so that they will be available for use in future disasters. 

Space-Saving Solutions

Conex box houses can be modified for the needs that different families and different climates will face. For example, they come in standard sizes ranging from 20 to 40 feet in length, meaning that large and small families can both be accommodated without wasting space. In addition, boxes can be stacked or joined when necessary to add even more space.

For additional information please contact our Sales Staff at 602-723-9608 option 1.

A Shipping Container is a container having the capability to withstand shipment, storage, and handling. Shipping containers range from huge reusable steel boxes used for intermodal consignments to the universal crimped boxes. It is important to secure the shipping containers from various threats such as vandalism and theft. Here some simple ways by which you can ensure security for your shipping containers and the belongings they carry.

1. Shipping Container Lock Boxes

Unlike padlocks, lock boxes are steel boxes that cannot be tampered with. It is almost impossible to break through these locks. These locks are big enough and cannot be fit into padlock and key. The design of the lock boxes keeps your padlocks out of view and inaccessible to lock cutters. These are an inexpensive, easy-to-install way to secure your storage containers.

2. Heavy Duty Padlocks

It is the simplest way of securing storage containers for your things being stored. Different styles of padlocks are available in the market. The most suitable style can be said as the “shutter” type padlocks. These provide security at a basic level and can be tampered easily.

3. Alarm System

This type of security has always proved as the best. Traditional alarm systems could be used if your container lies near a building or a phone line because they need an electrical connection or on-site landline. Another option can be the GSM container alarm that offers you 24-hour remote monitoring and wireless installation capabilities through the mobile phone network.

4. Crossbar Locks

These are portable and are easily installable within seconds without welding. The crossbar locks prevent the primary doors’ handle from turning. They are designed so smartly that even if someone succeeds in cutting the padlock, they cannot get access to the container.

For additional information please contact our Sales Staff at 602-723-9608 option 1 and ask about all the modifications we can offer.

Depending on where you build, and how/if your containers are combined, you may not even need a roof.  If you do need a roof, or just want one for appearance sake, it’s really not that hard to build one.  A simple low pitched (3:12 or 4:12) shed roof, if you like that look, is probably the easiest and cheapest to build.  Be sure to keep in mind how you are going to insulate the roof, and whether of not you will need access under the roof to do it.

This  roof was a variation of the typical pole shed found around here with rafters and purlins covered with galvanized metal roofing.  A simple roof like this can be completed in just a couple of days with three moderately skilled craftsmen. 

For additional information please contact our Sales Staff at 602-723-9608 option 1.

 

No matter what most people say, storing items in a standard shipping container, that is exposed to the elements, does not necessarily mean that your items will be safe from moisture issues. You are still susceptible to dangers from condensation inside the container itself, which will collect on the ceiling and walls, trickling down due to differences in temperature, endangering the items you placed inside. This humidity can appear due to a number of reasons, mostly being trapped under the plywood container floor or due to already being present inside, being present in the items being stored and so forth. Humidity in the atmosphere will also play a part in the process, but there are ways you can get around it.

When temperatures cool off during the evening, water droplets will often form inside containers due to condensation, most often on the ceilings due to the difference between the outside and inside temp.  If you don’t do anything about it your storage area will likely develop quite a bit of a moisture problem.


Dampstick Condensation Control Poles

You can make use of this to remove the dampness from the air before it condensates. (above)

Grafo

Another material you can use that can be applied by spraying it onto the container ceiling itself.  (above)

Foil encased bubble wrap

This is a cheap, effective and easy way of insulation, as it will be applied to the ceiling and walls of the container.  (above)

Insulated panels

This will allow you to line the entire container with some 25mm or 50mm wall to ceiling and the entire ceilings insulation panels made of Polyisocyanurate.  (above)

For additional information please contact our Sales Staff at 602-723-9608 option 1.

A few years back an interesting shipping container project that was being built around Bluff City Tennessee.Sorry that we don’t have more details about the builder, or the purpose of this container structure but in the meantime, we thought a few photos would be enough to spark interest in this type of shipping container barn design. 

For additional information please contact our Sales Staff at 602-723-9608 option 1.

AZ Containers has a number of affordable options if you are looking to purchase a storage container. Our containers come with or without modifications, you choose what’s best for you and we’ll work on pricing it right for your needs.

Once you’ve purchased, we’ll deliver where and when you need. Storage containers come in a variety of sizes shown on our web site http://azcontainers.com/sales-units. If you need assistance determining your storage container needs, please contact us using the quote form http://azcontainers.com/quote-request-0 or for additional information please contact our Sales Staff at 602-723-9608 option 1.

It’s Not Just a Steel Box, It’s a Storefront

The modular design of containers makes them an ideal solution for moving large quantities of products. But why stop there? The mental leap from hauling merchandise to using the vessel as a storefront is an easy one to make. Internationally, containers are ideal, imaginative solutions to physical shops. 

In 2013, the Downtown Container Park opened in Las Vegas’ newly revived Fremont District. Billed as a shopping and entertainment center, this lively infrastructure is home to a variety of boutique shops, restaurants and other small businesses. In true Vegas fashion, the park is also home to a 40-foot-tall, fire-spewing praying mantis and a 33-foot-tall slide.

 

In many parts of the world, especially regions with ports or large harbors and limited resources, the idea of using discarded containers is nothing new. Odessa, Ukraine boasts the largest open-air market in Europe. The center, made entirely out of shipping containers, covers an area more than the size of 315 football fields. It’s estimated that around 150,000 people visit the market every day.  These sturdy storage containers aren’t just for big business complexes or offices. For smart companies, size, transportability and the inherent versatility of containers make them attractive options.

Big Challenges Mean Big Rewards

Refurbishing containers is an investment for customers and the designers, engineers, architects and salespeople involved in each project. Too often, people become enamored with the aesthetics or the portability prospects of modified units and don’t pay enough attention to some of the challenges these renovations can bring.

“When we’re approached about a container, they’re either very defined in what they want, or they’re curious about what the possibilities are,” said Campbell. “Either way, there’s always a conversation about costs vs. benefits and structural integrity.”

For those considering converting a container into a livable space, such as a cabin, pool house or office – and even for something as simple as an outdoor bar – insulation is a major concern. Steel is strong and durable, but it is also conducts temperature extremely well. In environments with severe climates, interior and exterior insulation is necessary.

Another concern that potential constructers need to be aware of is land use, zoning and building restrictions. Obtaining permits or certificates and navigating stringent building codes are essential issues for those doing modifications and for those who own the altered containers. Everything from doors and floors to electrical wiring must be up to code, regardless if the unit is secured on a foundation or made for life on the road.

Offering more advanced modification amenities is a service many sales and rental offices are considering or already engaged. With proper foresight and a clear understanding of the involvement these alterations require, modified units will continue changing the way we think about, and sell, containers.

For more information please contact our Sales Staff at 602-723-9608 option 1.

Construction work can be characterized by two qualities: hefty and temporary. Avoid worrying about the safety of your equipment and buy or rent a storage containers. A conex container will keep your equipment organized, accessible, and most of all, secure. Also, consider an office container for your construction site for a mobile, air-conditioned spot to take care of business.

Here’s why shipping containers make the perfect storage solution for construction sites.

STRENGTH OVER TIME

Construction projects can last days, weeks, months, or years—time spans that vary job-to-job. This means you’ll need a structure ready for the challenges presented by long-term outdoor exposure.

With the heavy nature of construction tools and equipment, and you’ve got a match made in heaven with shipping containers. Their original purpose was to transport goods across the ocean via freight ship, so these boxes have proven resilience. Durability is not just beneficial; it’s necessary, and shipping containers are the best structures out there for the job.

UNBEATABLE MOBILITY

The temporal nature of construction work also demands easy movability. Especially with construction projects, it’s much more convenient to relocate equipment when its provisional home has the ability to come along. Despite their large size, shipping containers can still be moved by truck, giving them the ability to mover anywhere that you do or your project does. And as long as the container is cargo-worthy. Combined with great sturdiness that makes your container suitable for a variety of weather conditions, mobility means that this storage solution will stay standing wherever you go.

EASY ACCESSIBILITY

The ability to keep your equipment directly on-site where you need to access it makes getting your items a breeze, and our modifications can make things even easier. Every container comes with two convenient cargo doors on one side, and can also be modified with an extra set, as well as walk-through doors, roll-up doors, or sliding doors to increase expediency of access. Within the container, you can apply some of our to further organize and improve access. For example, our stable shelving systems make items visible when you walk in, making them easy to grab. See our modification section on our web site: http://azcontainers.com/modifications

THE IDEAL STORAGE SOLUTION

It’s difficult to find a way to store heavy equipment in a way that keeps it safe with the ability to move, but buying or leasing a shipping container is a way to avoid building something more permanent but guaranteeing the kind of safety that a traditional building would allow for. Our portable storage containers are built to keep equipment away from not only weather, but also thieves and vandals. And since this structure can also be moved from place-to-place when your team does, you really can’t lose.

For more information please contact our Sales Staff at 602-723-9608 option 1.

With the green premise growing in popularity across the globe, more and more people are turning to cargo container structures for green alternatives. There are countless numbers of empty, unused shipping containers around the world just sitting on shipping docks taking up space. The reason for this is that it’s too expensive for a country to ship empty containers back to their origin. In most cases, it’s just cheaper to buy new containers from Asia. The result is an extremely high surplus of empty shipping containers that are just waiting to become a home, office, apartment, school, dormitory, studio, emergency shelter, and everything else. More information after the break.

There are copious benefits to the so-called shipping container architecture model. A few of these advantages include: strength, durability, availability, and cost. The abundance and relative cheapness (some sell for as little as $900) of these containers during the last decade comes from the deficit in manufactured goods coming from North America. These manufactured goods come to North America, from Asia and Europe, in containers that often have to be shipped back empty at a considerable expense. Therefore, new applications are sought for the used containers that have reached their final destination.

On November 23, 1987, Phillip C. Clark file for a United States patent describe as a “Method for converting one or more steel shipping containers into a habitable building at a building site and the product thereof.” This patent was granted on August 8, 1989 as patent 4854094. The diagrams and information contained within the documentation of the patent appear to lay the groundwork for many current shipping container architectural ideas. In 2006, Southern California an architect designed the first two-story shipping container home in the U.S. as an approved structural system under the strict guidelines of the nationally recognized Uniform Building Code. Even more impressive is Lot-Tek’s Puma City, which was built with abundant material at a low price, without substituting design quality. As such, there are many great examples of shipping container architecture in the world.

Shipping container architecture gets a lot of encouraging coverage in the design world as a trendy green alternative to traditional building materials, and seems like a smart choice for people looking for eco-consciousness. However, there are a lot of downsides to building with cargo containers. For instance, the coatings used to make the containers durable for ocean transport also happen to contain a number of harmful chemicals, such as chromate, phosphorous, and lead-based paints. Moreover, wood floors that line the majority of shipping container buildings are infused with hazardous chemical pesticides like arsenic and chromium to keep pests away.

With the green premise growing in popularity across the globe, more and more people are turning to cargo container structures for green alternatives. There are countless numbers of empty, unused shipping containers around the world just sitting on shipping docks taking up space. The reason for this is that it’s too expensive for a country to ship empty containers back to their origin. In most cases, it’s just cheaper to buy new containers from Asia. The result is an extremely high surplus of empty shipping containers that are just waiting to become a home, office, apartment, school, dormitory, studio, emergency shelter, and everything else. More information after the break.

There are copious benefits to the so-called shipping container architecture model. A few of these advantages include: strength, durability, availability, and cost. The abundance and relative cheapness (some sell for as little as $900) of these containers during the last decade comes from the deficit in manufactured goods coming from North America. These manufactured goods come to North America, from Asia and Europe, in containers that often have to be shipped back empty at a considerable expense. Therefore, new applications are sought for the used containers that have reached their final destination.

Shipping container architecture gets a lot of encouraging coverage in the design world as a trendy green alternative to traditional building materials, and seems like a smart choice for people looking for eco-consciousness. However, there are a lot of downsides to building with cargo containers. For instance, the coatings used to make the containers durable for ocean transport also happen to contain a number of harmful chemicals, such as chromate, phosphorous, and lead-based paints. Moreover, wood floors that line the majority of shipping container buildings are infused with hazardous chemical pesticides like arsenic and chromium to keep pests away.

Reusing containers seems to be a low energy alternative, however, few people factor in the amount of energy required to make the box habitable. The entire structure needs to be sandblasted bare, floors need to be replaced, and openings need to be cut with a torch or fireman’s saw. The average container eventually produces nearly a thousand pounds of hazardous waste before it can be used as a structure. All of this, coupled with the fossil fuels required to move the container into place with heavy machinery, contribute significantly to its ecological footprint. Another downside is that dimensionally, an individual container creates awkward living/working spaces. Taking into account added insulation, you have a long narrow box with less than eight foot ceiling. To make an adequate sized space, multiple boxes need to be combined, which again, requires energy.

In many areas, it is cheaper and less energy to build a similarly scaled structure using wood framing. Shipping container homes makes sense where resources are scarce, containers are in abundance, and where people are in need of immediate shelter such as, developing nations and disaster relief. While there are certainly striking and innovative examples of architecture using cargo containers, it is typically not the best method of design and construction. 

Contact Rolando at AZ Containers at 877-292-6937.

Plan to move my horse home, and trying to find the most economical way to store the year's hay. The estimate for a two stall barn with hay loft blew me away $$ so I'm trying to find other solutions. Horse really only needs a good run-in, but what to do with the hay?

Has anyone stored in Conex containers or shipping containers? Some things I'm wondering about in particular are ventilation and what kind of base or footing needs to be underneath one.

Sadly, I have a beautiful huge loft above my garage that would do perfectly, but it's attached to my house, so it doesn't seem prudent due to fire risk. Right…?

Here are some Recommendations:

A.) I wouldn't put hay in your garage for the simple reason: rodents! They will be in your house in no-time! Fire danger as you mentioned would be too much of a risk, plus I wouldn't want to encourage any critters to come in too.

B.) I know shipping containers have been used for hay storage. One good thing about them, IIRC, they are sealed and keep critters out. But might be a bit of an eyesore.

C.) I got the container at least 10 yrs ago. I think the turbine was cheap. Paint was a good exterior and the insulation was about $500. For the turbine installation--You will need a cutting torch, drill (attaching turbine) and caulk or have it done by AZ Containers.

D.) I put a 6 inch layer of limestone roadbase under the container. I've used a shipping container for years to store hay in hot humid Florida. I don't recall ever having a problem with hot bales or moldy hay. I will confess I don't close one of the doors all the way because it's too much of a fight to do unless extreme weather--rain/wind--come. It stays gapped a bit and I tie it so it doesn't blow open. The container is without alterations such as vents. I do have good turnover in my hay so that may help although some of the hay I buy for Mr Fussy, my horse, may get stored many months, especially if I find something he eats and I can stock up.

E.) I've only used them for storing equipment and supplies on work sites. We just level the ground and put down gravel. 

One thing to keep in mind is that even white-colored Conex boxes sitting in full sun can get hotter than blue blazes inside. I definitely wouldn't consider it for hay without installing good ventilation (maybe both the roof turbine(s) and some vents around the bottom), and I'd be inclined to stack the hay very loosely and make sure it's well-cured before storage. A layer of pallets might really help the bottom layer of hay, too.

That all sounds fussy, but it's cheaper than having hay go bad...

Hope this helps you out. 

Contact Rolando at AZ Containers at 877-292-6937.